Uber, Lyft Get More Regulation from New York City on LES

New York City’s government is enforcing more regulation that could adversely affect Uber, Lyft and ride share companies. As a part of a plan to improve the quality of life for those living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, a area heavily populated area with bars and restaurants, the city is proposing a plan to enforce a no standing rule for vehicles from midnight to 6 am on the east side of streets between a targeted 6-block area on Ludlow and Orchard Streets between Houston and Delancey. The west side of the streets in the area will have a stricter no standing rule from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days a week. Standing vehicles left overnight will be towed.

The city aims to limit congestion and noise with the new rules.

“The world loves New York nightlife, but we also have to take care of the New Yorkers who live where others play,” said Mayor de Blasio. “We are creating cleaner, quieter streets to improve quality of life while ensuring bars, restaurants and clubs can thrive.”

The rule could affect business for ride share companies like Uber and Lyft, and drivers who frequently drop off and pick up passengers from the many bars and restaurants in the area.

The plan includes an increase in the Taxi and Limousine Commission enforcement patrols to crack down on unlicensed for-hire vehicles double parking and making unauthorized pickups. A 10-person team of TLC officers and supervisors will conduct random patrols between 11pm and 3am at least once every Friday and Saturday night.

For more than two years, NYC and Ride share companies have struggled to find common ground as regulations increase. Congestion pricing and additional fees imposed by the city has left the relationship between NYC and Uber, Lyft and other ride share companies strained. Consumers also felt the heat from the struggle with price increases that were added to the app as a result of regulations.

READ: our previous coverage of the NYC’s struggles with Uber http://newyorkcitywired.com/uber-recruits-consumers-civil-rights-nyc-fight/.

The plan to improve the quality of life on the Lower East Side also includes increased trash and litter cleanup,

“No one needs to sacrifice safety to enjoy NYC’s nightlife,” said Acting TLC Commissioner Bill Heinzen.  “Most importantly, we strongly encourage people on the town to take licensed taxicabs or book for-hire vehicles through an app or base if they choose that mode of transit.  Applying vigilant enforcement to complement our efforts to reduce the effects of congestion will make the nightlife experience a safer one by targeting illegal and potentially dangerous operators and protecting club patrons who may find themselves confronted by these unlicensed profiteers.”

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Monica Link

Monica Link

Monica Link, Publisher and Editor for New York City Wired, is a New York City-based multi-media journalist, entrepreneur and performer producing media including content, stage, film and events. Her resume includes interviews with celebrities, New York Times bestsellers, executives and fashion designers. Ms. Link is the founder of Link4Productions Media and Entertainment. The production company has produced sold out events with thousands of attendees, live theater written and produced by Monica Link, and technology and fashion media websites New York City Wired and Snobby Diva. Her performance credits include singing soprano with a Stellar Award nominated choir and theater stage actress. Monica also writes and serves as on on-air journalist. Her media writing and on-air work include Bold TV, National Mortgage News, Tribes art reviews, and the New York Observer.